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How to translate in Translation Workspace XLIFF editor

Translation Workspace / Geoworkz is a translation solution marketed by Lionbridge, a large translation company. Translation Workspace consists of a cloud-based component hosted at translate.translationworkspace.com, where resources such as translation memories and glossaries are stored, and of editors that must be installed locally. Translators can choose between two editors: an MS Word add-in (similar to Wordfast Classic, MetaTexis or Trados Translator’s Workbench) and a standalone XLIFF editor (with an interface similar to that of Trados TagEditor). Both editors only work in Microsoft Windows.

Translation Workspace is sold as a monthly or yearly susbscription and its price depends on the number of words translated each month. Here are examples of subscription plans for freelancers as per May 2015:

Translation Workspace subscription plans

A trial (good for 30 days and 5000 words) is available. A credit card is needed in order to sign up for the trial. The credit card won’t be charged if the trial is cancelled before the end of the trial period.

This video (second in a series of two) shows how to translate a Word document converted to the XLIFF format in Translation Workspace XLIFF editor, using resources added to a Translation Workspace “tenancy”. Resources include a newly created, empty TM, a reference TM with material imported from a TMX and a small glossary with content imported from a tab-delimited text file. The reference TM and the glossary are then “background linked” to the empty TM: when that TM is selected in the XLIFF editor, background linked resources will be available during the translation. The first video in the series shows how to add resources (newly created, empty TM, a reference TM with material imported from a TMX and a small glossary with content imported from a tab-delimited text file) to a Translation Workspace “tenancy”, how to “background link” the reference TM and the glossary to the empty TM and how to convert a Word document to the XLZ format (zipped XLIFF) used by the Translation Workspace XLIFF editor.

Related post: How to set up Translation Workspace

How to set up Translation Workspace

Translation Workspace / Geoworkz is a translation solution marketed by Lionbridge, a large translation company. Translation Workspace consists of a cloud-based component hosted at translate.translationworkspace.com, where resources such as translation memories and glossaries are stored, and of editors that must be installed locally. Translators can choose between two editors: an MS Word add-in (similar to Wordfast Classic, MetaTexis or Trados Translator’s Workbench) and a standalone XLIFF editor (with an interface similar to that of Trados TagEditor). Both editors only work in Microsoft Windows.

Translation Workspace is sold as a monthly or yearly susbscription and its price depends on the number of words translated each month. Here are examples of subscription plans for freelancers as per May 2015:

Translation Workspace subscription plans

A trial (good for 30 days and 5000 words) is available. A credit card is needed in order to sign up for the trial. The credit card won’t be charged if the trial is cancelled before the end of the trial period.

This video (first in a series of two) shows how to add resources to a Translation Workspace “tenancy”. Resources include a newly created, empty TM, a reference TM with material imported from a TMX and a small glossary with content imported from a tab-delimited text file. The reference TM and the glossary are then “background linked” to the empty TM: when that TM is selected in the XLIFF editor, background linked resources will be available during the translation. Using the Convert function of Translation Workspace Tools, a small Word document is converted to the XLZ format (zipped XLIFF) used by the Translation Workspace XLIFF editor. The second video in the series shows how to perform the actual translation (from Finnish into English), using the resources (translation memories, glossary) set up in the tenancy.

Related post: How to translate in Translation Workspace XLIFF editor

Patch Match in memoQ 2015

Under certain conditions, memoQ 2015 is able to “repair” (“fix”, “patch”) fuzzy matches. When a new source segment only differs from an already translated segment on one or two words that are found in a termbase, memoQ will yield an “enhanced” match rate for a fuzzy match that attempts to fix the differences. Such enhanced match rates are preceded by an exclamation mark.
This video uses the same English>German sample sentences as in the memoQ 2015 online help.

Transit NXT – import terminology via TMX

This video shows an alternative way to import terminology from an Excel sheet into a Transit NXT as a TermStar dictionary, using Heartsome TMX editor. This is faster and simpler than using a tab-delimited text file and creating a custom import definition, as shown in another post. Credit goes to Tristamson, who suggested this method in a comment on YouTube.

Related posts:
STAR Transit NXT – Part 1 (2): Set up project with external resources
STAR Transit NXT – Part 2 (2): Translate with imported resources

Transit NXT – Translate with imported resources

This video (second in a series of two) presents the translation environment and interface of STAR Transit NXT and shows how to translate a short Word document with resources that were imported from Excel (terminology) and a TMX translation memory (used as reference material).

The first video in the series showed how to create the project and import the external resources into it.

Also see:
STAR Transit NXT – Part 1 (2): Set up project with external resources

Transit NXT – Set up project with external resources

This video (first in a series of two) shows how to create a new project in STAR Transit NXT, how to import terminology from an Excel sheet into a TermStar dictionary, how to convert a TXM translation memory into a Transit “translation pair” and how to add that translation pair as reference material for the project. A small Word document is also added to the project and will be translated with the imported resources (terminology, TMX).

The second video in the series will focus on the actual translation in the Transit NXT environment.

Related link:
STAR Transit NXT – Part 2 (2): Translate with imported resources

Top 10 YouTube channels for translation technology

YouTube is one of the most popular social medias nowadays and many actors of the translation industry – both companies/organizations and individual translators – are using it to promote their products or their views. I have listed in the table below the top 10 channels (by number of subscribers), as per December 9th, 2014. Do let me know if you feel I have forgotten a popular channel!

Channel's nameSubscribersViewsVideosCreated
1. SDL Trados3,505730,809140Mar-2009
2. CATguruEN1,822272,045117Oct-2011
3. Wordfast TM1,037107,49625Oct-2011
4. Marta Stelmaszak94129,01720Apr-2011
5. TAUS Videos41782,399339Dec-2009
6. LionbridgeTech30424,73756Nov-2009
7. memoQ30127,167181May-2009
8. Atril Déjà Vu20585,63235Jun-2011
9. Kevin Lossner18923,30356Apr-2011
10. Paul Filkin??16,52751Oct-2006

Import from Excel into DVX3 multilingual termbase

Déjà Vu X3 supports multilingual termbases. This video shows how to create such a termbase (using the Minimal template) and how to import terminology into it from an Excel sheet with four languages (English, French, Finnish, Swedish). The Excel file needs to be saved as XLS, as Déjà Vu X3 doesn’t support the newer XLSX format. For optimal results, Unicode should be selected as the encoding when importing terminology from Excel.

The same sample Excel file was also used to import terminology into a memoQ multilingual termbase in my First Steps with memoQ 2014 R2 video. The termbase portion of that video starts at 02:58.

First steps with memoQ 2014 R2

This video shows how to translate a Word document from scratch in memoQ 2014 R2. A new project (English-French) is created, the document is imported , a new translation memory is created, a new termbase (multilingual: English-French-Finnish-Swedish) is created, with sample terminology imported from an Excel sheet, the document is translated interactively and finally the translated document is exported. The video also shows the new ribbon first introduced in memoQ 2014 R2.

Create a Custom Search Engine, integrate with IntelliWebSearch

Google’s Custom Search Engine can be a convenient way to restrict searches to several specified domains, like the site:domain.com setting in Google’s Advanced Search for a single site/domain.

Anyone can create any number of custom search engines for free, as long as they have a Google account. Each custom search engine can include any number of sites/domains.

This video shows how to create a custom search engine for Finnish newspapers that includes the websites of five newspapers, as well as another custom search engine for Wikipedia in three different languages.

Once a custom search engine has been created, it can be integrated into IntelliWebSearch (Windows-only) using the following values for the Start and Finish fields:

Start -> http://www.google.com/cse?cx=PART1%3APART2&ie=UTF-8&q=
Finish -> &sa=Search&hl=en

where PART1 and PART2 are the two components of the unique identifier of the custom search engine, as displayed in the public URL of the engine.

For example, if the public URL of a custom search engine is:

https://www.google.com/cse/publicurl?cx=001578379530956773680:y3n4c5omgnq

then, PART1 is 001578379530956773680 and PART2 is y3n4c5omgnq