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Solution to Wordfast Classic crashes on Mac

Many Wordfast Classic users experience crashes with Word 2011 for Mac. These crashes occur when using any VBA application (for instance Wordfast Classic, but also Zotero) in Word 2011 and accessing the Dock in OS X to switch to other applications. The solution is simply to auto-hide the Dock, by right-clicking the end of the Dock and selecting Turn Hiding On. It’s also possible to reach the same setting via System Preferences > Dock > Automatically hide and show the Dock.

How to use LF Aligner on Mac

LF Aligner is a freeware, open source, multiplatform (Windows, OS X, Linux) alignment tool based on Hunalign and written by Farkas András. This video shows how to use LF Aligner to align two Word documents, how to review the alignment in Excel and how to create a translation memory in the TMX format from the alignment. Heartsome TMX Editor is used to open the TMX memory and browse through its content. Any translation tool (Wordfast Pro, OmegaT, CafeTran, Swordfish etc.) should be able to open the TMX file.

The last step of LF Aligner for Mac 3.12 (saving alignment as TMX) ignores any changes made to the alignment in Excel during the reviewing process. For that reason, the TMX translation memory should be created with TMX maker, a script included in the Tools subfolder of the main LF Aligner folder.

A handy macro (MergeCells.xla) is included in LF Aligner, but only in the Windows distribution, though it works perfectly in Excel 2011 for Mac as well. It is therefore a good idea to download the Windows distribution (LF Aligner 4.05 for Windows) and extract MergeCells.xla from it. The macro features a keyboard shortcut (Ctrl+J) used to merge two consecutive cells.

This video demonstrates all of the above with two sample Word documents (DOCX) in Finnish and Swedish.

Wordfast Pro glossary from Word table or Excel sheet

Existing terminology in a Word table or in an Excel sheet can be easily imported into a Wordfast Pro glossary, as long as the table/sheet has two columns (source terms, target terms) or three columns (source terms, target terms, comments).

A Word table first needs to be converted to text (function found under the Layout tab, once the table is selected), with tabs (default) as separators. The resulting document must be saved as plain text, with Unicode as the encoding (UTF-8 also works). The saved text file can be imported into a Wordfast Pro glossary.

An Excel sheet can be saved directly as Unicode text, after which it can be imported into a Wordfast Pro glossary.

This video shows how to do it with a sample Finnish-Russian term list.

Five Studio 2014 videos by Daniel Brockmann

The latest version of SDL Trados Studio, 2014, was released on September 30th, 2013. Its Welcome screen includes a new Get Started tab with links to five videos made by SDL’s Daniel Brockmann:

Studio 2014 – get started tab

These videos can be viewed prior to installing Studio 2014 by clicking the links below:

A quick tour around SDL Trados Studio (15:04)
Creating and managing projects (12:05)
Translating single documents (25:40)
Working with project packages (06:16)
Working with GroupShare online projects (06:35)

The video files are in the WebM format and it should be possible to view them in any recent browser, including on mobile devices.

The files can also be downloaded for offline viewing with supported video players, for instance the popular VLC media player.

It should be noted that – for some reason – SDL decided to produce the videos in standard definition (480 x 852 pixels, also known as 480p). Hopefully, they will eventually make higher definition (720p, 1080p) versions available on their YouTube channel.

Terminology recognition and auto-completer in OmegaT 3.0

Terminology recognition in OmegaT is handled via tokenizers. Starting with version 3.0.0, tokenizers are included in the standard OmegaT distribution, whereas one had to download them separately in previous versions. They are also automatically selected during the project creation process, whereas one had to launch them via the command line in previous versions. Tokenizers are especially important for terminology recognition in heavily inflected languages. This video shows how the tokenizer works with Finnish as the source language.

Starting with OmegaT version 3.0.1, recognized terminology can be inserted in the target segment via a new auto-completer feature, which works entirely in the editor pane and with the keyboard (the shortcut is Ctrl+space in Windows, and Esc in OS X, so as to stay consistent with the system-wide completion engine). In previous versions, one had to right-click with the mouse in the glossary pane. This video shows how terminology can be inserted in the target segment, using a sample Finnish-English project.

Related link:
Finnish tokenizer (Lucene)

Related posts:
First steps with OmegaT
Machine translation in OmegaT for Mac
Machine translation in OmegaT for Windows

Machine translation in OmegaT for Mac

This video shows how to use two popular machine translation services (Google Translate, Microsoft Translator) in OmegaT for Mac, a free, open source translation tool.

Related posts:
Machine translation in OmegaT for Windows
First steps with OmegaT
How to obtain a Google Translate API v.2 key
New Microsoft Translator API with Client ID and Client Secret

Related links:
OmegaT HowTo: Using Google Translate in OmegaT
OmegaT HowTo: Setting up MS Translator on Mac

Machine translation in OmegaT for Windows

This video shows how to use two popular machine translation services (Google Translate, Microsoft Translator) in OmegaT for Windows, a free, open source translation tool.

Related posts:
Machine translation in OmegaT for Mac
First steps with OmegaT
How to obtain a Google Translate API v.2 key
New Microsoft Translator API with Client ID and Client Secret

Related link:
OmegaT HowTo: Using Google Translate in OmegaT

100,000 views on YouTube channel

Six months ago, in early October 2012, my YouTube channel reached 500 subscribers and 50,000 views.

Today (7-Apr-2013), it reached 100,000 views:

Next milestone: 1000 subscribers. Thanks to all subscribers and viewers, subscribe if you haven’t already!

SDL OpenExchange – revolution or gimmick?

When SDL first announced its OpenExchange platform in March 2010, it was touted as an innovation that would “revolutionize the translation industry”. Three years later, in March 2013, SDL states in a press release that “over 500 developers have signed up” and that “app downloads double year on year”.

This video shows that the OpenExchange platform has had a rather limited impact so far and mostly provides a way for SDL to add missing features that are built-in in competing tools.

Relevant links:
SDL’s email from 3-Mar-2010 announcing the OpenExchange platform
SDL’s press release from 20-Mar-2013
SDL’s infographics on OpenExchange

TM’s “under the hood” – Trados vs. memoQ

Translation tools use different mechanisms to store data in their translation memories, resulting in TM’s that varies greatly in size and structure. This video shows how a sample Finnish-English TMX with about 70,000 translation units and 48 MB results in a 31 MB TM in Trados Translator’s Workbench 8.3, in a 83-139 MB TM in SDL Trados Studio 2011 and in a 303 MB TM in memoQ translator pro. The Trados Workbench TM consists of 5 files, the Studio 2011 of a single file and the memoQ TM of 20 files.

This constitutes the introduction to a video to be released later on about concordance search in Trados Workbench, SDL Trados Studio and memoQ, focusing on single Finnish words.

Relevant link:
TMX translation memories (fi-en) used in the video